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The Crack Magazine

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Studio Courtenay's New Digs

When Studio Courtenay, a local sustainable brand known for their colourful clothes and eclectic prints, were told they had to be out of their current studio space in 6 months, owner and Creative Director Louisa Rogers wrote an impassioned article on the difficulties of finding a great creative space in the North East. Her article went viral across the local communities – apparently most of the city has had similar struggles at one point or another – and before she knew it, there was a sudden influx of local studio, office and commercial lease owners reaching out to offer their premises as Studio Courtenay’s potential new home. One of these was Carliol Square, just around the corner from their current location, and after a viewing, a new lease was signed that day. Literally, that day. Who could say no to natural light and a move that meant most of your stock could be moved in under 10 minutes?

For a while there were discussions about whether it would be feasible to run Studio Courtenay, and their sister brand Trendlistr Vintage, from Louisa’s kitchen whilst they found somewhere to set up – but in hindsight trying to ship designer vintage and house endless rolls of deadstock fabric amongst the spatulas and cutlery was never really going to work. One of Studio Courtenay’s biggest pulls and the centre point of so much of their company ethos is that everything they do and make is here in the North East, so there’s a certain serendipity to the fact it was the local communities that banded together to help find them a new home.

You can see Studio Courtenay’s website here.

Faith Richardson

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